College & University Students

On Campus Housing

  • Make a fire escape plan with your roommate(s) the day you move into your dorm.
  • Check your room windows to see if they open easily and if you are able to use them for escape.
  • In a real fire emergency, it will probably be dark and smoky, so you should crawl low under the smoke and keep your mouth covered. After crawling to the door, use the back of your hand to feel it. If the door is cool, open it slowly but be ready to quickly shut it if smoke or heat comes in. Remember to close the door behind you as you leave to reduce the spread of fire and smoke. Stay low and continue crawling down the hallway toward your exit. If the door is hot, this indicates the fire is on the other side, so you should crawl to your window. Climb out of the window if possible, using an escape ladder if you have one. If you can’t escape out the window, signal for help at the window by yelling and waving a light-colored shirt, pillowcase or blanket or wave a flashlight instead. 
  • Count the number of doors between your dorm room and the stairwell. By knowing the number of doors you must pass to get to the stairwell, you’ll be able to find your way out easier. Practice feeling the doors to the stairwell with your eyes closed to simulate the smoky conditions that exist in a fire.
  • Designate a meeting location away from the building that all of your roommates are aware of. Then one person should call 911 from a cell phone or a neighboring building.
  • When a fire occurs, time should never be wasted trying to save valuables and keepsakes.
  • Never go back into a burning building for any reason! Even one breath of the superheated, smoky air is enough to kill!
  • Practice your fire escape plan at least twice per year.
  • Know where the fire extinguishers are located on your floor and learn how to properly use them.
  • Take each fire alarm seriously and quickly evacuate the building every time. Never ignore a fire alarm that is sounding.

Off Campus Housing

  • Make sure you have working smoke detectors before you move into your apartment or house. Contact your landlord or property manager if you don’t have any or if they don’t work. Ensure they are operable before and after moving in. Remember to check their batteries once per month.
  • Make a fire escape plan with your roommate(s) the day you move into your apartment or house.
  • Make sure you have at least two ways out of every room, like the primary door and a window.
  • Check your windows to see if they open easily and if you are able to use them for escape.
  • In a real fire emergency, it will probably be dark and smoky, so you should crawl low under the smoke and keep your mouth covered. After crawling to the door, use the back of your hand to feel it. If the door is cool, open it slowly but be ready to quickly shut it if smoke or heat comes in. Remember to close the door behind you as you leave to reduce the spread of fire and smoke. Stay low and continue crawling down the hallway toward your exit. If the door is hot, this indicates fire is on the other side, so you should crawl to your window. Climb out of the window if possible, using an escape ladder if you have one. If you can’t escape out the window, signal for help at the window by yelling and waving a light colored shirt, pillowcase or blanket or wave a flashlight instead.
  • If you live in an apartment building, count the number of doors between your apartment and the stairwell. By knowing the number of doors you must pass to get to the stairwell, you’ll be able to find your way out easier. Practice feeling the doors to the stairwell with your eyes closed to simulate the smoky conditions that exist in a fire.
  • Designate a meeting location away from the building that all of your roommates are aware of. Then one person should call 911 from a cell phone or a neighboring building.
  • When a fire occurs, time should never be wasted trying to save valuables and keepsakes.
  • Never go back into a burning building for any reason! Even one breath of the superheated, smoky air is enough to kill!
  • Practice your fire escape plan at least twice per year.
  • Know where your fire extinguishers are located and learn how to properly use them.
  • Take it seriously if the smoke detectors sound and quickly evacuate the building, closing all doors behind you as you escape. If you receive nuisance alarms, consider having the smoke detector relocated. Never disconnect the smoke detector from its power source to prevent nuisance alarms.
Have a safety concern and want to make a complaint? Visit our Request for Action page and follow the instructions.
Is there anything wrong with this page?

Let us know if anything is wrong with this page. However, please don't include any personal or financial information.