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Has this ever happened to you: You’re sitting at an intersection patiently waiting for your turn and here comes the Fire Department with red lights and sirens blaring. They pass through the light and all of the sudden their lights and sirens go off. You’ve missed the light and feel like they have abused their power.

We occasionally have someone stop into Fire Headquarters to complain about this scenario.

But here is the rest of the story.

Whenever the fire department responds and uses lights and sirens, they do so based on the best information they have at that moment. Frequently, all they know is that a fire or a fire alarm has been reported and it is their job to respond as quickly and safely as they possibly can. If it is a multi-truck response, the vehicles try to stay together in a convoy so passing through intersections is done all at once. This is safer for the fire department and the public.

It is not uncommon to receive updated information while in route that causes the truck to downgrade their response.  This information may come from an alarm company, an official already on the scene, or from a BGFD responding unit from a different station. Sometimes these calls are received as an engine passes through a light.

With more than 5,000 emergency responses each year, sometimes it just happens.  When new information leads to a downgrade in response, BGFD turns off their lights and sirens and they either continue with the “flow of traffic” or “cancel and return to the station” depending on the situation.

Now to the point.

Please bear with all of our public safety employees as they respond in the safest way possible even though it may be frustrating to you as a driver.   And rest assured, we never use our emergency lights and sirens to pass through an intersection unless we are actively responding to a reported emergency.  Not only is it against state law, it is against all professional rules for operating an emergency vehicle.

If you have any questions about the travel of BGFD or any of our public safety officers, please feel free to contact us at 270-393-3642.

Historical Marker #2158 in Warren County remembers Shake Rag, an African American community founded in the 1800s.

Shake Rag was added to the National Register of Historic Places in September 2000, becoming Bowling Green’s first National Register district recognized for its importance to African American history. Founded on land donated in 1802 for use as an African American public square, the neighborhood grew steadily following the Civil War and into the twentieth century.

Life in Shake Rag revolved around church, school, and family. The State Street Baptist Church was founded by a group of slaves who were baptized and received membership from Bowling Green Baptist Church. Despite their membership, certain restrictions were placed on them, including not being allowed to participate in decision making and being required to sit in the gallery of the church. A member recalled it being “a main source of the community’s social as well as religious goings on.”

The marker reads:
Shake Rag This African American community was founded in the 1800s. Bordered by the river and High, KY., and 7th Sts, the area grew to include hundreds of residents, two schools, businesses, and churches. The architecture of Shake Rag shows a growing middle-class community.

The marker was dedicated in 2004 through the financial support of the city of Bowling Green.

An open lot owned by the City of Bowling Green at the Corner of 3rd and College Streets in the Shake Rag District is slated to be developed into a green space park. The City of Bowling Green will hold a Project Open House regarding the development of a new Shake Rag Park at the corner of 3rd and College Street.

The open house will take place on February 19, 2019 from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. at the George Washington Carver Center at 201 State Street.

Please stop by at any time to ask questions, review plans and discuss ideas with City staff.

 

Trees and Limbs

Recently we have seen both heavy rains and snow/ice in the Bowling Green area. It is not unusual for these storms and weather conditions to cause trees to fall and to produce a large amount of debris. If you reside within the City of Bow ling Green limits, Scotts Waste Services provides your trash pick-up.

Often times, residents call the City regarding the disposal of brush and limbs. These calls increase after a storm due to the large amount of brush throughout the City that needs to be picked up.

If you have brush or limbs that need to be picked up, please remember that it must be cut less than 5 feet in length and 6 inches in diameter. The brush must be placed in a trash receptacle or tied in a small bundles at the curb. Scott Waste can dispose of 3 cubic yards per week per household.  If a large tree has fallen it may take longer than one week for it to be picked up and disposed of.

Please remember that if you use a professional service to cut down a tree that has partially or totally fallen, that person is then responsible for hauling away the waste and debris as well.

For more information, or if you have a large amount of brush that you need to request pick up for, you can always call Scott Waste at 270-783-4016.

 

Do you know what Parker Bennett Community Center has to offer?

Parker Bennett Community Center is one of two facilities with multiple services available through the City of Bowling Green Parks and Recreation Department.

The center not only serves as the location for a before and after school program, but can also be rented for birthday parties, baby showers, graduation parties, family reunions and more. Fall, Spring, and Summer camps are also held at the Parker Bennett Community Center.

The before and after school programs are free and provide services to school aged students from 6:00 to 7:30 a.m. and from 2:45 to 6 p.m. on school days throughout the school year. The facility is equipped with two pool tables, an air hockey table, two foosball tables and a bumper pool. Staff takes pride in helping students with their homework and ensuring the safety of each child.

The mission of Parker Bennett is to offer a comprehensive variety of quality recreational programs and facilities to the residents and guests of the Bowling Green community.

For more information about the before or after school programs, camps, or renting the Parker Bennett Community Center, please call 270-393-3249.

2019 Youth Kickball!

Do you have children ages 6 to 12 years old who are interested in playing a fun and active sport this winter? If so, the Bowling Green Parks and Recreation kickball league is for you. Kids can get in a “kick” with this great activity.

The Parks and Rec kickball program is a supervised event that includes fun, meeting new friends and it’s a great way to improve health and fitness – especially during these cold winter months.

Registration dates are January 22nd – February 7th online only at https://playbgpr.bgky.org. Games will take place on Thursdays between 5:30 and 8:00 p.m. at the FO Moxley Center.

Kickball is a popular playground game and is typically played among young, school-age children. The lack of both specialized equipment and highly skill-based positions (like pitcher) makes the game an accessible introduction to other sports.

The cost is only $20 per child! We’re looking forward to kick-starting this year in a fun way!

North Side Training Center

The Bowling Green Fire Department has several stations throughout the City, but what you may not know is that Station 5 on New Porter Pike has a long history of uses for the City before it became a fire substation. Station 5 plays a vital part in training Bowling Green firefighters today.

In 1983, 2.47 acres of land was purchased on New Porter Pike for $45,000. In 1984, a classroom building was constructed for $154,000 and was used for police shift change and training.  A draft pit was also built at the same time for the Fire Department to practice extinguishing chemical fires.  A fire training tower used to simulate different types of building fires was constructed in 1985 for $213,000 and in 1986, a burn pit was established.  Additionally, in 1987, a burn building was built for $100,000 to provide a place for firefighters to practice extinguishing an actual fire and to perform rescue operations in an enclosed space and experience the heat and smoke that accompany fires.

Both the Police and Fire Departments used the property for several years.  Then in 1999, a fire substation was built to better serve the needs of the north/northeast section of the City.  The main building was added to and transformed into living quarters for the firefighters. A three bay garage area was added to house several pieces of apparatus and equipment and a large classroom was built that is used for training new firefighters and for ongoing education classes for all fire personnel.

 

Because the training tower, burn pit and burn building were already in place, the Fire Department’s Training Division moved into this building as well, allowing for ready access to the training facilities.  Physical testing for potential new hires is done at Station 5 as well, using the Candidate Physical Agility Test (CPAT) course that is housed on the property.

Over the last several years, many other training props have been added to help firefighters practice and prepare for real-world incidents.  They include a flashover chamber, a confined space prop, a maze, structural collapse props, a vehicle extrication prop and a firefighter safety survival  prop, as well as a vehicle fire prop that is set to arrive soon.  All of these training props allow fire personnel to hone their skills so they are better prepared when any given emergency arises.

Aging is for everyone!  The Age-Friendly Bowling Green initiative seeks to make Bowling Green, KY a better place to grow old by promoting an “age-in-everything” lens across all aspects of city life. This hands-on community initiative asks the city’s public agencies, businesses, cultural, educational and religious institutions, community groups, and individuals to consider how changes to policy and practice can create a city more inclusive of older adults and more sensitive to their needs.

According to “The Case for Age Friendly Communities” prepared for Grantmakers in Aging,“An age-friendly community is one that is a great place to grow up and grow old.

It has:

  • safe and accessible public transportation options;
  • affordable, accessible, and safe housing;
  • pleasant and safe parks and outdoor spaces;
  • quality community and health services;
  • sufficient employment and volunteer opportunities; and
  • engaging social activities and events for people of all ages.

The needs and preferences of older adults are taken into account. Older adults are respected, and their knowledge, skills, resources, and contributions are sought out. They are integrated into the fabric of the community.”

One of the ways Bowling Green seeks to harness the valuable contributions of our older adults is in partnership with WKU Aging and AARP Kentucky through the presentation of its Over 50 Citizens Academy.  The four and a half day academy is targeted to adults over 50 and is a behind-the scenes look at City government and a thoughtful exploration of livable communities.  And don’t think that the academy is just for someone of “a certain age”!  Past participants include members of the “sandwich generation”, raising children while caring for aging parents, along with still-working business owners, both newly and long retired workers, all incomes, education levels, and of varying hobbies.  Artists, sports fans, musicians, readers, fitness buffs, gear heads, travelers, fishermen, and more have all made up the previous classes of the academy.

 

The next Academy takes place weekdays, March 7-13 from 9:00-4:00 p.m., with graduation at lunch on Wednesday, March 13.  Register online for the academy here:  http://www.bgky.org/ncs/over-fifty-citizens-academy#schedule

Academy alumni participate in alumni reunion events and have also started planning additional Age Friendly Bowling Green activities, including a series of roundtable discussions coming this spring.  They also have been recruited to participate in various service opportunities with other City programs.  Contact Karen Foley at Karen.foley@bgky.org or call 270.393.3674 to learn more.

 

 

Dana Beasley Brown was elected to the City Commission in November 2018. Commissioner
Beasley-Brown works at Bowling Green Junior High in the Youth Services Center where she
spends each day supporting kids and their dreams.


Commissioner Beasley-Brown first came to Bowling Green almost 20 years ago as a freshman
at Western Kentucky University. After visiting the Hill and the Corvette Museum, she knew then
that Bowling Green was her home.

Commissioner Beasley-Brown is excited about the opportunity to serve her community as a City
Commissioner. She is committed not only to stewarding the city’s current growth, but ensuring a
legacy for generations to come. Commissioner Beasley-Brown will listen to our community and,
with citizens and stakeholders, work toward a shared vision for our city. As a City Commissioner,
Beasley-Brown is appointed to the Barren River Health District Board and the Economic
Development Incentive Program Committee.


Commissioner Beasley-Brown is married to Jason Brown, an Executive Minister at Broadway
United Methodist Church. She has two children: Stockton, age eleven, and Evangeline, age
eight. Together, they love cheering on our Hilltoppers, having fun at the soccer fields and
watching the Great British Bake-off.

CHRONOLOGY OF CITY COMMISSIONERS
(Beginning January 1, 1968)
January 1, 1968 to December 31, 1969
Spero Kereiakes
C. A. Porter
Jack D. Sublett
Charles L. Wilson, Jr.

January 1, 1970 to December 31, 1971
Henry M. (Hank) Brosche
Spero Kereiakes
Glen Lange
Charles L. Wilson, Jr.

January 1, 1972 to December 31, 1973
Glen Lange
James D. Shanahan
B.L. (Bernie) Steen
Charles L. Wilson, Jr.

January 1, 1974 to December 31, 1975
James D. Shanahan
B.L. (Bernie) Steen
Charles L. Wilson, Jr.
Glen Lange (Resigned Oct. 1, 1975. No one was appointed to fill his
position as his term was due to expire Dec. 31, 1975.)

January 1, 1976 to December 31, 1977
Harold Asher Miller
James D. Shanahan
Charles L. Wilson, Jr.
Charles Ray Woosley

January 1, 1978 to December 31, 1979
Harold Asher Miller
Patsy T. Sloan
Charles L. Wilson, Jr.
Charles Ray Woosley

January 1, 1980 to December 31, 1981
Alan W. Palmer
Clyde Payne
Patsy T. Sloan
B.L. (Bernie) Steen

January 1, 1982 to December 31, 1983
Alan W. Palmer
Patsy T. Sloan
B.L. (Bernie) Steen
Charles L. Wilson, Jr.

January 1, 1984 to December 31, 1985
Elwood Janes
Harold Asher Miller
Alan W. Palmer
Patsy T. Sloan

January 1, 1986 to December 31, 1987
Elwood Janes
Alan W. Palmer
Patsy T. Sloan
Charles L. Wilson, Jr.

January 1, 1988 to December 31, 1989
Carol J. McIvor
Alan W. Palmer
B.L. (Bernie) Steen
Charles L. Wilson, Jr.

January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1991
Carol J. McIvor
Alan W. Palmer
B.L. (Bernie) Steen
Charles L. Wilson, Jr.

January 1, 1992 to December 31, 1993
Robbie E. Bond
Joe W. Denning
Carol J. McIvor
John O. Oldham

January 1, 1994 to December 1996*
Robbie E. Bond
Joe W. Denning
Diane Howerton (8/1/95 to 12/96 – appointed by Mayor Webb to fill vacancy
left by resignation of C. McIvor)
Carol J. McIvor (Resigned 6/30/95)
John O. Oldham

January 1, 1997 to December 1998
Jim Breece
Joe W. Denning
Diane Howerton
John O. Oldham

January 1, 1999 to December 2000
Jim Bullington
Joe W. Denning
Dan Hall
Sandy Jones

January 1, 2001 to December 2002
Jim Bullington (appointed Feb. 20, 2001)
Mark. O. Black (died in office)
Joe W. Denning
Dan Hall
Alan W. Palmer

January 1, 2003 to December 2004
Jim Bullington
Joe W. Denning
Dan Hall
Alan W. Palmer

January 1, 2005 to December 2006
Mark Alcott
Brian “Slim” Nash
Delane Simpson
Brian Strow

January 1, 2007 to December 2008
Joe W. Denning
Brian “Slim” Nash
Brian Strow
Bruce Wilkerson

January 1, 2009 to December 2010
Joe W. Denning
Catherine Hamilton
Brian “Slim” Nash
Bruce Wilkerson

January 1, 2011 to December 2012
Joe W. Denning (appointed Mayor February 15, 2011 to fill the unexpired term
following the resignation of Mayor Elaine Walker; appointed
Commissioner November 15, 2011 to fill the vacancy created by Bruce
Wilkerson who was elected as Mayor)
Melinda Hill (appointed March 3, 2011 to fill the vacancy created by Joe W.
Denning appointed as Mayor due to Elaine Walker being appointed as
Secretary of State)
Brian “Slim” Nash
Bill Waltrip

January 1, 2013 to December 2014
Joe W. Denning
Melinda M. Hill
Bill Waltrip
Rick Williams

January 1, 2015 to December 2016
Joe Denning
Melinda M. Hill
Sue Parrigin
Rick Williams

January 1, 2017 to December 2018
Joe Denning
Brian “Slim” Nash
Sue Parrigin
Rick Williams

January 1, 2019 to December 2020
Dana Beasley-Brown
Joe Denning
Brian “Slim” Nash
Sue Parrigin

*In 1991, voters amended the State Constitution providing for local elections to be held in
even-numbered years. As a result, the Commissioners elected to serve in 1994 served a three year
term beginning in January 1994 and ending in December 1996.

BGPR Fitness Facility!

Looking to get in shape for the New Year?  Wanting to make resolutions to improve your health? Trying to lose those extra “Holiday” pounds that are so easy to gain?  Then check out Bowling Green Parks and Rec Fitness Facility.  B.G.P.R. Fitness is a fitness center that offers a variety of programs, classes, and activities to help you achieve your fitness goals and get you more physically active!

Do you like to workout at your own pace?  Then Individual Weight Lifting may be just the thing for you.  Come in on YOUR schedule and work out in our 10,000 sq. ft. facility, offering the latest, top notch equipment to help you lose weight, tone, firm, or build your body.

Needing a little more direction and motivation with your work outs?  Then check out our Instructional Training Sessions, designed to provide you the know-how, personalization and one on one training to assist you in achieving your goals.

Prefer a “group” atmosphere when it comes to exercising?  Then B.G.P.R. Fitness is the right place for you!  We offer a variety of group exercise classes such as Yoga, Spinning, Zumba, Boot Camp, Total Abs, Sculpting, Pro Fit and many more.

Fitness, Fun and Friends….you’ll find them all at B.G.P.R. Fitness. Work out with others, at your own pace, in our SilverSneakers Fitness Program or enjoy a game of wallyball with friends. You will find all this and more at B.G.P.R. Fitness.  Come enjoy the many opportunities awaiting for you, with no contracts, initiation or enrollment fees.  Student rates and senior citizen discounts are available along with a variety of fitness plan rates to fit your specific needs.

Visit http://www2.bgky.org/bgpr/fitness/index.php for more information on rates and what BGPR has to offer.

B.G.P.R. Fitness Facility….Be Active, Get Fit, Stay Healthy!  

225 East Third Ave, Bowling Green, KY, 42101

270-393-3582

www.bgky.org/bgpr/fitness

 

#AdventureswithMillie

The Bowling Green Fire Department’s newest member doesn’t say much, can’t drive a firetruck or pull a hose line, but she’s already proving her worth.

Millie, a two year old black Labrador Retriever, is an Accelerant Detection Canine. Millie and her handler, Fire Investigator Captain Michael Cornwell, both graduated December 7, 2018 from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) Accelerant Detection Canine (ADC) Handling School in Virginia. Cornwell applied for the school several months in advance and was selected by the ATF to attend. After the first week of training, Millie was placed with Cornwell based on their personalities and she officially began to live with him at his hotel. The training itself was six weeks long, seven days a week.

Accelerant Detection Canines have a sense of smell that is 100,000 times more acute than a humans, they are completely unbiased and free of judgment, they are able detect an accelerant on clothing, shoes or a body in a crowd, and they can usually cover an entire scene in 30 minutes saving hours if not days in time.

Over the course of the six week ADC school, Cornwell and Millie learned to work together to identify evidence at fire scenes, resulting in a more accurate and credible detection resource than devices that are currently available. Cornwell was also instructed on how to keep Millie healthy and safe. In order to prevent their training from being compromised, Millie will live with Cornwell and will have to work to be fed, either through rigorous daily testing or while at an investigation.

Millie will not only be working at fire scenes but will also eventually be involved in helping to teach fire safety to local groups. We are excited for Millie to be a part of our team both for investigations and educating the public.

“I have always had a deep love of animals and the idea of working with canines has peaked my interest for many years, really ever since the first time I observed a working service dog,” said Cornwell. “Millie is a very friendly and hardworking dog. She is very calm for a 2 ½ year old Lab and has a great temperament with people. It’s fun to watch her get excited when it’s time to work. You can see a noticeable change in her when I put the food pouch on my belt.  This “food pouch” is what indicates to her that it’s time to work.”

We can’t wait for the coming years of #adventureswithMillie!

 

 

 

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